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Programme in Advanced Materials: Innovative Recycling

The AMIR programme has been developed to help students understand the full spectrum of all the core topics within the field of raw materials recycling. Drawing on the expertise of 6 European universities, AMIR brings together the collaboration of academia, industry and research partners to develop one of the world’s leading programmes within the field. Students have the opportunity to study across multiple European universities that specialise in the specific aspects of Advanced Materials: Innovative recycling.

Degrees Awarded

The AMIR Master programme offers students the possibility of obtaining a double diploma; a nationally accredited diploma from each of the two partner universities where they study. Currently the following combinations of partners lead to a double diploma:

  • First year at the University of Bordeaux and second year at either the Technical University of Madrid or TU Darmstadt
  • First year at NOVA University Lisbon or the University of Miskolc and second year at either the Technical University of Madrid, TU Darmstadt or University of Liège*

*Subject to the completion of certain modules during the First year.

All other first/second year combinations are technically possible, and lead to the award of a single diploma from the university attended in the first year. All graduating students are given a diploma supplement/certificate from the AMIR programme. This document will specify that they successfully completed the programme obtaining (at least) 120 ECTS, and at which of the partner universities they studied.

First Year

In year 1 students will acquire an understanding of the full raw materials value chain and will develop a mindset for innovation and entrepreneurship.

The first year of the AMIR Master programme takes place at the University of Bordeaux, NOVA University Lisbon or the University of Miskolc. Students will learn about the general and technical aspects of the raw material value chain, including – general chemistry, materials science, lifecycle of materials, as well as the learning outcomes of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT): sustainability, intellectual transformation, value judgments (ethical, scientific and sustainability challenges), creativity, innovation, leadership and entrepreneurship. Please click on the institutions’ titles below for further information on the courses offered by each one respectively.

1st semester – Autumn Semester
Elaboration of Inorganic Materials

This course is devoted to the development of inorganic materials. The first part deals with the extraction of minerals and large metallurgical processes. The second part develops the different methods for the synthesis of inorganic materials in powder form. An introduction to sintering is also presented. The third part focuses on the innovative methods of sol-gel type chemistry. In the last part thin-film processes are also explored. – Download a detailed course description.

Bonds in Chemistry

The objective of this course is to study chemical bonding in order to reveal the link between structure and composition, as well as between reactivity and properties of compounds, whether in organic molecules, transition metal complexes or solids. Particular emphasis will be placed on reactivity problems in organic chemistry as well as on properties of transition metal complexes.

Chemical/Structural Analyses of Solids

The main classes focus on the description of light-matter interactions, including techniques of spectroscopy (photoelectrons, auger, X-ray fluorescence) or electron microscopy (transmission and scanning). For the structural analysis of crystallised solids the student should be able to initially describe their periodic structure using groups of space and the international tables of crystallography. The study of powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction will allow students to determine the group that describes the symmetry of the studied object and connect the intensities measured to the positions of the atoms in the unit cell.

Sustainability and Life Cycle Assessment of Materials

The goal of this course is to provide students with knowledge on current sustainability challenges and the related triple bottom line of sustainable development. The students have to (i) understand different criticality assessment methods, (ii) get a basic understanding of the value chain of raw materials recycling, (iii) learn the methods, software and databases to measure environmental impacts and the resource flows of raw materials and products by life cycle assessment and material flow analysis. Students will also learn the value of the economic aspects of criticality and life cycle analysis studies for materials and processes.

Materials Dismantling and Recycling

This lecture aims to present the major classes of materials (with a focus on metallic, ceramic and hard composite classes) their properties and the associated characterisations, with a clear emphasis on various skills required besides dismantling and recycling of various material classes. For illustration, the programme combines theoretical and practical approaches: (i) elemental separation (selective dissolution, precipitation in aqueous/organic solvents) based on Potential vs pH or Ellingham diagrams, (ii) practical work on device dismantling, recycling and reuse from case studies (electronic cards in personal computers, separation and reuse of the constituents of aeronautic composites: carbon fibres –within polymeric matrix, etc.), (iii) a presentation of some innovative processes (hydrothermal, supercritical fluid processes) as an alternative to incineration for ceramics or composite materials.

2nd semester – Spring Semester
Creativity, Innovation, Leadership and Entrepreneurship

The Entrepreneurship Module delivered by Tecnalia is based on team-entrepreneurship, building interdisciplinary teams that aim to solve and work in real projects for customers or end-users on a learning-by-doing basis. Additionally, communities of young entrepreneurs/managers are created as a space to share their current business ideas, challenges and problems in order to become more competitive and learn from each other. In both cases, the support and facilitation of a team coach are necessary to lead the process and facilitate the training sessions and all learning activities. This module allows participants to enhance their talent and develop the skills needed for creating innovative projects. Participants are trained for the development and implementation of new projects, products or services that generate value in society, as well as leading the creation of new businesses and/or leading new innovative projects within existing companies.

Solid State Physics

This lecture provides an introduction to the physics of the solid state. The objectives are: (i) the description of lattice vibrations (phonons) as well as (ii) the electronic structure of different types of solids: metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators. Different levels of description and basic concepts are discussed, including free electron gas model, concept of reciprocal lattice, Bloch theorem, quasi-free electron model, tight-binding model, electronic bands theory and thermal and conduction properties.

Master 1 Internship

Within the 1st year of the Master programme, every student has to be engaged in an internship research project in a Chemistry Research Unit of the university (for further information please refer below to the websites of the 5 laboratories that participate with AMIR students for Master 1 internships)

The aim of this internship is for students to experience a research environment in one of our world renowned laboratories. The evaluation will be carried out by a committee composed of professors participating in the AMIR programme and the researcher responsible for the student during the internship. The internship is credited with 3 ECTS.

French Grammar/Culture (or English for French students)

For non-French-speaking students: Practice of spoken and written French – Discovery of France’s cultural aspects and everyday life communication. This teaching unit allows the full integration of students coming from various horizons. For French-speaking students: Practice of spoken and written English to reach level B1 minimum (TOEIC 550 pts) – Learning scientific/professional communication.

From Devices to Fundamental Aspects

This study focuses on the environment and standards. The example of lead based ferroelectric materials with applications in domains such as electronics and radars etc., will be used to illustrate these critical challenges in the development of new materials that are safer for the environment, whilst performing as well as the lead based ones.

Industrial Seminars

Industrial seminars will be programmed based on the fields of expertise of the most engaged industrial partners. At Bordeaux the industrial seminars will be delivered by:
(i) The CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie atomique) on new energy sources and nuclear waste recycling
(ii) Veolia, illustrating the issue of e-wastes: “a significant source of valuable raw materials”
(iii) ArcelorMittal, as the world’s largest steel producer and one of the main actors within metal recycling
(iv) Local industrial players (Lelectrolyse, Pena, Bee&co)

1st semester – Autumn Semester
Materials Selection and Sustainability (Mandatory)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students: It is intended that students acquire the ability to choose what is the best material for a given application. Considering the wide variety of existing materials, this process is only possible when using a selection methodology that systematically classifies materials by figures of merit (material indexes). The selection methods for material processing, shaping and joining also have a similar approach. This methodology is supported by a specific software that works with a database of material properties.

Syllabus: Material and process selection focusing on design, performance, cost and environmental constraints. Databases for materials selection. Graphic representation of properties as a basis for a selection strategy: Ashby’s selection system. Selection methodology and application to real-life situations. Selection methodology as a tool for the development of new materials, processes and applications.

Substitution by Clean Technologies and Green Chemistry (Mandatory)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): To acquire basic knowledge, skills and competences related to the application of sustainability within the products and processes of the Chemical Industry.

Syllabus: Chemical Industry, Chemicals and their impact on modern lifestyles. The Principles of Green Chemistry and Sustainable Engineering. Toxicology. The European legislation on chemicals (REACH). Sustainable Chemistry metrics. Life Cycle Analysis. The tools of Green Chemistry. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis. Waste reduction. Intensification of processes. Alternative solvents. Biotechnology and Biorefineries. Carbon capture and sequestration.

Characterisation, Monitoring and Rehabilitation Techniques

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): This subject provides training on the functionality and application of characterisation techniques: electron microscopy (SEM-FIB), AFM, spectroscopy in visible, UV and Infrared Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, XRD, XRF, NMR. It describes advanced monitoring tools (in-line and on-line Raman, NIR, UV, and NMR) for tracking critical process parameters and critical quality attributes to enable Quality by Design (QbD). Multivariate data acquisition and data analysis tools, design of experiments, design, analysis, and control of manufacturing processes are also explored. It provides expertise in designing solutions for contaminated sites using methodologies of evaluation.

Syllabus: Electron microscopes: transmission (TEM), scanning (SEM) and scanning transmission (STEM). Electron detectors and X ray spectrometry (EDS and WDS). Elemental analysis in SEM-EDS/WDS. Optical Spectroscopy: Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Visible-Near Infrared, Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. XRD-XRF. NMR. Introduction to Process Analytical Technology (PAT). Biosensors. Multivariate data analysis- design of experiments. Definition and identification of CPP’s and CQA’s. Automatic Process control. Integrated methodology of evaluation of contaminated sites. Remediation techniques. In-situ and ex-situ (on-site and off-site) processes. Developing stages, use, applicability, confidence and duration. Case studies and available software use.

Finance for Entrepreneurs

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): 

  • LO1- Gives students a conceptual framework on dealing with a global competitive environment.
  • LO2- Provides the main tools to the business environment, highlighting the role of financial management as an instrument of strategy.
  • LO3- Evaluates and selects different financing instruments exploring risk, profitability and solvency.
  • LO4- Interprets a company’s economic and financial situation using the most common financial management techniques (Balance Sheet, P/L account and ratios methods).
  • LO5- Provides the concepts and tools to develop risk management in international markets, including those arising from interest rates and exchange rate mismatching.

Syllabus:

  1. To be an entrepreneur in a global market: Context and challenges
  2. Financial management as a strategic tool
  3. Business plan: Methods of financial forecasting
  4. Risk, profitability and leveraging
  5. Financing business opportunities
  6. Economic and financial analysis
  7. Using hedging instruments to cover risks in international markets
Mineral Resources in the Circular Economy (Optional)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): This course intends to give students an understanding of the importance of mineral

resources in society and in the circular economy. Students will be able to understand global geopolitics and its impacts in society and the existence of policies in the supply and demand of critical and non-critical raw materials within the advent of the 4th Industrial Revolution. Students will also  be able to understand the life cycle of a mine and understand ores as a multiple source of critical raw materials, including the potentialities of recovery from waste in a philosophy of fundamental and environmentally sustainable economic activity. They will be able to understand geological processes and mineral deposits mechanisms and identify potential resources to be exploited in a given region.

Syllabus: Non-renewable resources. Mineral resources (MR) and metals. Privileged regions and global geopolitics. Provision policies. Commodities and super-cycles. 4th Industrial Revolution and MR. CRM’s. Circular economy and its direct dependence on sustainable MR exploitation. Mine life cycle and its relations with raw material production. Ore and minerals as a multiple source of CRM’s. Metal recovery from mine waste. Conciliation of PRM (primary raw materials) and SRM (secondary raw materials). Mineralising fluids and genetic processes. Alteration-mineralisation. Supergenic alteration. Metallogenetic models and zoning. Lithogeochemistry, metal deposits and its relationship with Plate Tectonics. Classes of mineral deposits. Types of ore, mineral chemistry, mineral texture and paragenesis. Fluid inclusion and isotopes. Mineral and textural identification. Geochemical characterisation. Pre-feasibility studies and international systems of reporting resources and reserves. Metallogenetic belts. Case-studies.

Chemical Reactors I (Optional)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): The main goal of this course is to provide students with the basic concepts of Chemical Reaction Engineering, in such a way that at the end of the course the students will be able to: determine a kinetic law corresponding to a given chemical reaction by calculating the kinetic parameters. To derive a kinetic law from a mechanistic proposal. To design ideal chemical reactors working under isothermal or non-isothermal conditions.

Syllabus:

  1. Ideal chemical reactors: batch reactor, continuous stirred tank reactor, plug flow reactor.
  2. Reaction rate and conversion. The general mole balance equation.
  3. Graphical methods.
  4. Stoichiometry and rate law.
  5. Batch reactors: optimising the operation time and conversion.
  6. Association of CSTRs. Pressure drop in the PFR. Reversible reactions.
  7. Unsteady state operation.
  8. Determination of kinetic parameters.
  9. Homogeneous non-elementary reactions.
  10. Non-isothermal reactors: the energy balance equation; continuous-flow reactors at steady state.
  11. Non-isothermal batch reactor.
  12. Multiple steady states in a CSTR: a brief looking on the steady state stability.
  13. Multiple reactions: selectivity and yield.
  14. Non Ideal reactors. Characterisation of flow by use of tracers. Modelling real reactors by association of ideal reactors
Nanomaterials and Energy (Optional)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the technology of coatings and thin films commonly used in coating processes from the functional and structural point of view.

Syllabus: Introduction to current energy problems:

  1. Materials and systems used in solar energy into electricity conversion, operation of solar cell manufacturing processes.
  2. Materials and Systems used in converting solar energy into thermal energy – importance of coatings/materials absorbers of radiation and other materials.
  3. Materials and systems for converting heat energy into electrical energy through the thermoelectric effect – the mode of operation, materials, manufacturing processes.
  4. Materials used in energy savings – chromogenic materials – principle of operation, type of materials used in manufacturing processes.
  5. Materials used in energy storage – the operation of batteries, materials and their respective advantages and disadvantages and ecological problems; fuel cells – operating principle, materials used, degree of development and implementation.
  6. Biomimetics, bio and electronic systems for the conversion/conservation of energy.
Transport Phenomena (Optional)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): At the end of this course, students will have acquired knowledge and skills that allow them to:

  • Develop a detailed understanding of the physical principles behind momentum transport by molecular and turbulent (natural and forced convection) mechanisms in flowing fluids and its mathematical expression.
  • Write the Energy Balance and the Species Continuity Equations for specific transport problems.
  • Determine changes in potential and kinetic energy, pressure and friction pressure losses in fluids circulating in pipes. Choose the most suitable pump type for a particular fluid transport and determine the required pump power.
  • Understand the fundamental concepts of heat transport. Calculate dimensionless numbers associated with heat transport and determine coefficients of heat transport through empirical equations.
  • Select and design the most appropriate heat transfer equipment to be used in chemical and biochemical industries.

Syllabus:

  1. Transport Basic Concepts: Equilibrium and driving forces; Operations in equilibrium stages and rate of transfer.
  2. Mass, Heat, and Momentum Transport by Molecular Mechanism: The general molecular transport equation and diffusivities; Newtonian fluids, non-Newtonian fluids, with time dependent and time independent viscosities.
  3. Turbulent Transport: The Reynolds Experiment; The general transport equation and eddy diffusivity; Mechanism ratio analysis; Dimensionless groups; Boundary layers: laminar and turbulent; Friction coefficient; Global transfer coefficients.
  4. Analogies among Mass, Heat, and Momentum Transfer: The Reynolds analogy, the Colburn analogy and the Martinelli analogy.
  5. Momentum Transport in Incompressible Fluids; The Bernoulli equation; Pressure drops; Fluid and pressure meters; Pumping liquids.
  6. Heat Transport: Conduction; Convection; Radiation; Heat exchangers; Use of insulating materials.
2nd Semester - Spring Semester
Advanced Topics in Materials Science and Engineering

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): The course intends to introduce relevant and advanced topics within modern functional materials science and engineering, providing a broad and deep understanding of the processing, nature and properties of the most relevant classes of materials that are of interest to industry. The course also aims to equip students with critical thinking on how materials can be selected and designed towards final applications, taking into consideration major challenges and sustainability issues.

Syllabus: Different classes of engineering materials, key properties and application areas. Potentialities in nanomaterials. Processing-microstructure-property relationships. Overview on advanced manufacturing techniques. Structural materials. Polymers. Composites. Biomaterials and healthcare. Materials for electronics and optoelectronics. Energy materials. Nanoscale possibilities and challenges. Sustainability. Design and simulation supporting selection of materials. Extraction and Processing. Life cycle and end of life.

Waste treatment and Recycling Technologies

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): The goal of this course is to give students a general overview on technical and scientific aspects on prevention, valorisation and recycling of wastes with a strong incidence in Materials Science and processing technologies. Aspects of the valorisation of wastes through waste treatment and recycling strategies that allow for a more efficient technical, ecological and economic action. Students will also approach prevention in the production of residues and wastes through modernisation of organisation and management strategies of the manufacturing sector, with a focus on the minimisation of industrial wastes.

Syllabus: Processing technologies of metallic, polymeric, electronic and ceramic materials; materials selection correlating properties, structure and processing; impact of materials in the environment; selection, separation and characterisation of solid residues; chemical processes on the treatment of materials for waste valorisation; application of bioprocessing of waste and its limitations; mechanical recycling of materials and wastes; ecologic materials and their properties.

Biocatalysis and Bioremediation

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): This course aims to provide fundamental principles on the biodegradation/biotransformation of hazardous pollutants and waste, and present emerging technologies for their elimination/reduction, using isolated enzymes or microorganisms vs. ‘bioaugmentation’.

Syllabus:

  1. Examples of biotransformations carried out on an industrial scale. Advantages of using nonaqueous media (NAM). Enzymatic properties in NAM. ‘Greener’ NAM: supercritical fluids and ionic liquids. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalysts.
  2. Enzyme classes most used in bioremediation. Relevance of NAM. Discovery of new enzymes and modification of existing ones. Applications. Enzymatic conversion of waste biomass and of CO2.
  3. Environmental contamination by hazardous substances; magnitude of the contamination problem. Types of pollutants (organic, inorganic). Physical/chemical transformation of pollutants in soil.
  4. Principles of microbiological degradation of pollutants. Microbial ecology. Factors influencing biodegradation. Biodegradation mechanisms (metabolism and kinetics).
  5. In situ and ex situ bioremediation. Aerobic vs. anaerobic bioremediation. Biostimulation vs. bioaugmentation.
Project in Innovative Materials Recycling and Sustainability

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): This course gives students research and development opportunities, promoting participation in research projects by the academic staff of the faculty. The scientific committee of the programme has a list of opportunities for students to participate in research projects. The student carries out the work plan during the course of the semester, with a core focus in the period between the end of exams and the beginning of the next semester, comprising a 5 week period at the lab. The student will have contact with scientific research environments and will gain knowledge on how research projects work in the area of innovative materials recycling and sustainability. The student will develop skills in presenting and explaining research results, along with other skills such as team working, oral and written communication and independent learning. Depending on the project chosen, the student will acquire specific knowledge on the subject area and also some specific technical skills in the project area.

Syllabus: Inclusion on the research team of choice (decided by the student) from a given set of projects available. Participation on the research work of the chosen project and preparation of a report.

Entrepreneurship

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): This course is intended to motivate students in entrepreneurship and the need for technological innovation. It covers a list of topics and tools that are important for new venture creation, as well as the development of creative initiatives within existing enterprises. Students are expected to develop an entrepreneurial culture, including the following skills:

  1. To identify ideas and opportunities to launch new projects.
  2. To get knowledge on how to deal with technical and organisational issues required to launch entrepreneurial projects.
  3. To understand the project implementation challenges, namely venture capital and teamwork management and find the right tools to implement them.
  4. To show and explain ideas and how to convince stakeholders.

Syllabus: Strategy for entrepreneurship. Ideation and processes for the creation of new ideas. Industrial property rights and protection: patents and technical formalities. Managing an entrepreneurial project: planning; communication and motivation; leadership and teamwork. Marketing and innovation for the development of new products and businesses. Business plan and entrepreneurial finance. System of Incentives for young entrepreneurs. Managing growth and intrapreneurship.

Industrial and Entrepreneurial Seminars

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): Industrial and entrepreneurial seminars will be devised to take advantage of the expertise of local industrial and economic partners that are called on to give an overview of the technological developments in their field of operations. Students will be able to have close contact with entrepreneurs and companies in the field of advanced materials and innovative recycling.

Syllabus: A specific syllabus is not applicable in this type of course. The seminars will address fundamental concepts and tools necessary for the evaluation of the sustainability of products and production processes. The discipline will embrace learning at the level of advanced materials, to develop intelligent production of goods and equipment, with the understanding of the macro scale of complex systems in engineering, which encompasses the evaluation of environmental, economic and social impacts due to decision-making.

Separation Processes I (Optional)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): The main purpose of Separation Processes I is to provide students with the ability to:

  • Understand the fundamental concepts of equilibrium-controlled separation processes used in the chemical industry: gas/liquid absorption, distillation, liquid-liquid extraction, humidification, and drying.
  • To design the equipment required for each of the studied processes.

Syllabus: Gas Absorption. Countercurrent vs concurrent multistage operation; Equilibrium stage; HOG and NOG; Criteria for design and operation of equipment. Distillation. Vapour- liquid equilibria; Multistage tray towers; McCabe and Thiele method; Packed towers; Batch distillation. Liquid Extraction; Liquid – liquid equilibria; Criteria for solvent selection; Stage wise contact; Continuous contact equipment. Humidification; Definitions. Wet-bulb and adiabatic-saturation temperature; Gas-liquid adiabatic operations; Equipment. Water-cooling towers. Drying; Equilibrium and definitions; Batch drying. Rate and time of drying; Continuous drying. Equipment and applications Introduction to Aspen. Resolution of exercises with multicomponent distillation column and solvent extraction column by Aspen.

Mineral Processing and Sustainable Exploration and Mining (Optional)

Intended learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and competences to be developed by the students): The course aims to provide students with the technical and practical concepts of mining and processing of ores, with emphasis on metallic ores and special sands. Namely, choosing the most appropriate techniques, equipment and procedures and environmental impacts. Students will be able to integrate team-works concerning the execution of technical mining projects, as well as to integrate the teams of monitoring and optimisation of processes and preparation of environmental impact studies. Learn mining exploration techniques and methodologies. Learn the steps and activities in an exploration and mining project. Mining project development, environmental impact assessment and licensing of exploration and mining projects.

Syllabus: Mining and mineral processing objectives. Mineralogical images and image processing. Liberation size. Physical and geomechanical properties of rocks for mineral processing and separation/concentration. Unit operations of liberation and separation. Comminution. Mechanical screening. Technologies and equipment for screening. Technologies and equipment for separation. Circuits of comminution-screening. Circuits of separation. Transport of solids and sludge. Decantation. Flocculation. Mass balance. Recovery indexes. Consumption of energy and water. Tailings dams. Environmental impacts. Techniques and stages of mining. Samples, pathfinders and equipment. Project and well logging techniques in exploration. Environmental impact in concessions. Life cycle of a mine and mining infrastructure. Methods of excavation and mineral extraction. Excavation and blasting. Mine closure.

Year 1 programme objectives

The programme at Miskolc aims to provide a solid background in materials sciences with specific focus on polymeric materials, composites, and recycling of wastes from different non-metallic waste streams. In addition to the theoretical courses in materials sciences and waste management and utilization, other courses will introduce also the methods, devices and technologies, providing the main skills for a successful materials engineer carrier, as well as cross disciplinary skills such as creativity, developing new ideas, managing and realization of processes for being future entrepreneurs.

1st semester – Autumn Semester (6 Core Modules = 32 ECTS)
Applied chemistry and transportation processes (6 ECTS)

Course content

The primary aim is to introduce the students to the chemical knowledge required for non-chemical engineering activities. Type and influence of the chemical reactions, the chemical specialty of the materials used in engineering. Quantity of the technological waters, chemical principles of technological water treatment. Water, water treatment, drinking water, industrial water, wastewater, and treatment. Type of catalysts and structures. Connection to chemical technologies. Raw materials of the chemical industry. Basics of Unit Operations. The chemistry of the natural gas, oil, mineral coal used for energy production. Energy production. Basics of the Green chemistry. Basics of C 1 -chemistry, Transport processes, viscosity, diffusion, heat transport, electric conductance, basics of hydrodynamics. Corrosion phenomena.

References:

  1. The material of the lectures is available for the students in pdf format.
  2. P.W.Atkins: Physical Chemistry II.
  3. Plawsky, Joel L. (April 2001). Transport phenomena fundamentals (Chemical Industries Series). CRC Press. pp. 1, 2, 3. ISBN 978-0-8247-0500-8.
  4. Transport Phenomena (1 ed.). Nirali Prakashan. 2006. p. 15-3. ISBN 81-85790-86-8., Chapter 15, p. 15-3

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the theories and practical methods of natural and technical sciences related to materials engineering.

– A fundamental knowledge of the information and communication technologies related to their profession.

  1. b) Skills

– Ability to perform laboratory investigations, to process, assess and document the measurement results.

– Ability to establish and communicate a sound engineering position on materials engineering issues both in Hungarian in a foreign language.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to bring the latest achievements of the field to own development

– Commitment to do high-level, high quality work and striving to communicate this attitude to co-workers

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems

– Making informed decisions individually after consultations with representatives from diverse fields (primarily that of law, economics, energy management, environmental protection), taking responsibility for decisions.

– Making decisions based on principles and applicability of environmental protection, quality assurance, consumer protection, product responsibility, equal rights to accessibility, as well as the basic principles of occupational health and safety, technological, economic and legal regulations, moreover basic requirements of engineering ethics.

Microstructure investigation 2 (6 ECTS)

Students acquire knowledge about special microstructure investigation techniques. Some of them will be used in practice and theory as well.

Course content:

Morphological classification of single and multi-phase materials. Characterization of grains and particles, interpretation of grain size distribution. Structural anisotropy and orderliness. Classification of two dimensioned grains by shape. Principles of SEM, XRD and TEM. Using image analysis method to characterize multi-phase structural. Project work. In the framework of project work, all students get an unknown sample. During lecture to practical course, students get information about his/her samples. The source of the information is provided by the studied examination methods. Based on this approach, they get knowledge both the theoretical and practical side of the techniques, while the identify and characterize their samples. At the end of the semester, students must make a presentation about their samples, i.e. they have to present their project.

References:

  1. Microstructural Investigation and analysis, Volume 4, B. Jouffrey, Online ISBN: 9783527606160, Print ISBN: 9783527301218, DOI: 10.1002/3527606165
  2. ASM Metals Handbook, Ninth Edition, v. 9, “”Metallography and Microstructures””, American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1985, p. 1
  3. Underwood E. E.: Quantitative Stereology. Menlo Park, California. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company. (1970) p. 23

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the theories and practical methods of natural and technical sciences related to materials engineering.

– A detailed knowledge of the main properties and areas of application of structural materials related to the specialisation.

– Knowledge of measurement techniques and theories related to the field.

– A fundamental knowledge of the information and communication technologies related to their profession.

– A comprehensive knowledge of modern materials structures and technologies.

  1. b) Skills

– An appropriate level of manual skills.

– Ability to process and systemise data collected during the operation of materials production systems and processes, and to draw the conclusions modelling the processes.

– Ability to perform laboratory investigations, to process, assess and document the measurement results.

– Ability to apply the procedures of production technology related to their specialization.

– Strive to enrich the knowledge base of their profession with original ideas through self-education.

– Ability to establish and communicate a sound engineering position on materials engineering issues both in Hungarian in a foreign language.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to bring the latest achievements of the field to own development.

– Striving to enforce the requirements of sustainability and energy efficiency.

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems.

Basics of waste management and waste utilization (7 ECTS)

The aim of the subject for students is to broaden their knowledge of waste management, including the history and development of waste management, and generation and types of industrial and municipal wastes.

Generation, types, composition, environmental effect of wastes. Definition and basics of sustainable development and sustainable raw material management. Determination of material characteristics (chemical and physical properties) and evaluation of the results. Material flow of production and consumption wastes. Domestic waste situation and comparison with foreign examples. The legal framework for harmonization with EU. waste incorporation of related laws. Waste types, waste management principles. Technical and technological solutions for waste management. Legislation of recovery special wastes (oils, batteries, packaging, construction, and demolition waste electrical and electronic waste, etc.). Mass balances, input-output matrices, their methods of calculation. Hazardous substances and their management. Life Cycle Assessment. Waste Register. The shipping and handling methods. Licensing procedures, responsibilities of the authorities. Incineration of waste, disposal services. Environmental impact studies, the substantive requirements of the rules of procedure. Waste Treatment acceptance of public. The importance of agriculture, chemical and metallurgical technologies in waste utilization. Relationship of waste management and environmental protection. Product and production integrated environmental protection. Treatment and preparation of wastes based on various utilization needs. Processes of mechanical waste preparation. General waste preparation technologies. Possibilities for material recovery from wastes. Utilization operations: biology techniques (composting, biogas production and utilization). Utilization operations: thermal technologies. Treatment of liquid and sludge-like wastes.

References:

  1. Bernd Bilitewski: Waste management. 1997. Springer Science & Business Media
  2. Jacqueline Vaughn: Waste Management: A Reference Handbook. 2009
  3. Ramesha Chandrappa: Solid Waste Management: Principles and Practice. 2012. Springer
  4. Integrated solid waste management: engineering principles and management issues. [book]:G Tchobanoglous, H Theisen, S Vigil – 1993 – cabdirect.org
  5. Waste management models and their application to sustainable waste management: AJ Morrissey, J Browne – Waste management, 2004 – Elsevier
  6. Hazardous waste management: MD LaGrega, PL Buckingham, JC Evans – 1994 – osti.gov
  7. Natural systems for waste management and treatment. [book]: SC Reed, RW Crites, EJ Middlebrooks – 1995 – cabdirect.org
  8. What life-cycle assessment does and does not do in assessments of waste management: T Ekvall, G Assefa, A Björklund, O Eriksson… – Waste Management, 2007 – Elsevier
  9. Lecture PowerPoint

Competences:

Students will know the fundamentals of waste management and the generation and utilization of wastes. Furthermore, they will be able to characterize – from process engineering and chemical point of view – and utilize the various wastes.

Recycling of glass, rubber, polymer and paper wastes (5 ECTS)

Students having knowledge about paper and plastics, glass and rubber as material, their properties and their production methods and technologies in the respective industries. Further obtaining knowledge about the quantity and quality of waste produced, their utilization as secondary raw material. Also, to learn their appearance in different waste streams, and their recycling technologies and unit operation level in regarding their utilization applications in commodity production and energetic utilization application.

The participation allows students to apply what they have learned in lectures about recycling processes in theory, its characterization and synthesis methods on a real scientific problem given by their supervisor. It will be taught from theory to practice which allows students to with learned theories they transform it to skills and competencies as it shows how theory may help to describe, understand, design, and operate recycling and process wise operations of paper, rubber plastic and glass wastes and how industry makes use of these principles.

The course covers the following topics:

Glass, rubber, paper, and plastic production. Properties of waste materials in comparison with original commodities in respect of utilization, their production and utilization. Waste streams and major appearance of paper, rubber, glass and plastic in these waste streams, quality, and quantity. Properties of rubber, glass, paper and plastics focusing the properties relevant to their recycling and separation. Technical solutions of paper, glass, rubber and plastic recycling, equipment and unit operation in paper and plastic recycling, energetic applications, and as secondary raw material utilization of plastics and paper

References:

  1. Brent Strong Plastics materials and processing, 2006 ISBN 0-13-114558-4
  2. Donald E. Hudgin (Manas Chanda, Salil K. Roy ed) PLastic Technology Handbook 2006, ISBN 978-0-8493-7039-7
  3. EU BREF – Production of Pulp, Paper and Board, EU BREF – Production of Polymers
  4. Ernst Worrell And Markus A. Reuter Handbook Of Recycling State-Of-The-Art For Practitioners, Analysts, And Scientists ISBN: 978-0-12-396459-5
  5. Tukker Plastics Waste – Feedstock Recycling, Chemical Recycling and Incineration ISBN 1-85957-331-2
  6. CP Rader, SD Baldwin, DD Cornell, GD Sadler, RF Stockel Plastics, Rubber, and Paper Recycling A Pragmatic Approach ISBN 0-8412-3225-X.
Materials testing (4 ECTS)

Purpose of the subject:

Theoretical and practical knowledge transmission in the topic of materials testing. The subject intends to explain the role and importance of material testing in construction, manufacture, diagnostic of operating condition, analyzing damages.

Practical knowledge transmission in measurements techniques are also one of the most important tasks. Definition of stress and strain. Definition of hardness: Brinell method, the tool and imprint geometry, relation of ball–size loading force and loading time, Vickers method, the tool, trace geometry, micro hardness, Rockwell method, principle of hardness, measuring tools and equations, harness of polymers. Tensile test: tensile tester equipment, the test specimen, force measurement, measuring of strain, the effect of deformation velocity, stress-strain curve, sections of elastic in curve, characteristic of the material: extension, contraction, resistance to tensile stress, yield strength. Material characteristics: defined by tensile test: modulus, Poisson ratio, hardening exponent, rigidity, Test serial: Compression test, compressive stress-strain curves, flexure test: basics and practical presentation. Fracture mechanics investigations: Fundaments of fracture mechanics, crack propagation, role of crack propagation, Charpy experiment, fracture of ideal elastic material, tension intensity factors KI, KII, KIII, KIC, elasto-plastic model, plastic model, fracture toughness. Fundaments of creep effect, creep-time diagram, creep-rupture strength, role of temperature on creep, relaxation process. Endurance test: basics, Wöhler- diagram, internal force, fatigue strength diagram, statistical methods (Weibull), simplified methods (LOCATI) Material category in terms of fracture behaviors: Brittle material, plastic super plastic fracture, Type of fracture and their material and temperature relation, transient temperature of different materials. Non-destructive testing: radiological testing, basics characteristics of ray, mass-absorption coefficient, contrast, sharpness, dosimeters, transparency, isotopic test Ultrasonic testing: basics, ultrasound generation, detectors, testing methods, acoustic tests. Significance of material testing in the industry: regulations of sample selection, basics: quality, data handling, standard specification, quality assurance.

References:

  1. Text Book: William D. Callister, Fundamentals of Materials Sciences and Engineering
  2. William D. Callister,Jr: Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering (second edition) John Wiley and Sons Inc. 2005 ISBN 0-471-47014-7 Louise Ferrante : Handbook of Advanced Materials Testing, CRC Press 1994. ISBN 9780824791964
  3. G.M. Swallowe: Mechanical Properties and Testing of Polymers, Springer Dordrecht 1999. ISBN 978-90-481-4024 -4

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the theories and practical methods of natural and technical sciences related to materials engineering.

– Knowledge of measurement techniques and theories related to the field.

– A comprehensive knowledge of modern materials structures and technologies.

  1. b) Skills

– An appropriate level of manual skills.

– Ability to determine the composition, structure, and properties of materials, as well as to select and operate the necessary instruments using relationships between different technical materials.

– Ability to perform laboratory investigations, to process, assess and document the measurement results.

– Ability to apply the procedures of production technology related to their specialization.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to bring the latest achievements of the field to own development.

– Striving to enrich the knowledge base of their profession with original ideas through self-education.

– Examining the possibilities of setting research, development and innovation objectives and striving to achieve them during work.

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems.

Polymer study (4 ECTS)

The course introduces the categories, the manufacturers, types and properties of the most common polymeric structural materials. Shows and explains the materials produced by domestic producers’ trough their catalogs and material data sheets. Evaluating and explaining the different information provided by the manufacturers of specific compounds.

Main themes of the subject:

Definition of polymers, plastics. Creating polymer molecules. Polymer characterization, molecular weight, polydispersity. Spatial structure, tactics. Polymer molecular mobility, properties. Polymers, polymer-based industries. Production of macromolecules, polymerization, copolymerization, polyaddition, polycondensation. Plastics. The most important concepts are plastic components (polymers, plasticizers, fillers), plastic types. Mass media (PE, PP, PS, PVC), engineering plastics (POM, PA, PES). Processing plastics. Basic concepts of melt rheology, flow models, calendering, extrusion, injection molding, stamping, casting, special processes. Properties and testing of plastics. Viscoelastic models, definitions, mechanical properties, modulus of elasticity, high deformations, rupture impact tests, orientation, creep, shrinkage, relaxation phenomena, models, time-temperature superposition, WLF equation, electrical properties, dielectric conductivity, insulating ability, shock, melt rheology.

References:

  1. .”Define polymer”. Dictionary Reference. Retrieved 23 July 2013.
  2. cCrum, N. G.; Buckley, C. P.; Bucknall, C. B. (1997). Principles of polymer engineering. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press. p. 1. ISBN 0-19-856526-7.
  3. Sperling, L. H. (Leslie Howard) (2006). Introduction to physical polymer science. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. p. 10. ISBN 0-471-70606-X

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the theories and practical methods of natural and technical sciences related to materials engineering.

– A comprehensive knowledge of modern materials structures and technologies.

  1. b) Skills

– Ability to determine the composition, structure, and properties of materials, as well as to select and operate the necessary instruments using relationships between different technical materials.

– Ability to perform laboratory investigations, to process, assess and document the measurement results.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to bring the latest achievements of the field to own development.

– Striving to enrich the knowledge base of their profession with original ideas through self-education.

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems.

– Taking responsibility for sustainability and environmental consciousness.

2nd semester – Spring Semester (4 Core Modules + 1 Elective Module = 28 ECTS)
Mechanical activation and particulate composites (6 ECTS)

The aim of the subject is to learn about the methods, devices and technologies of mechanical activation and manufacture of particulate composites.

Students will know the main methods and devices of mechanical activation. Furthermore, they will be able to select and apply the various types of mills and allied devices for related technologies.

History of mechanical activation. Detailed program of the course. Fundamental process engineering, physical-chemical and chemical properties of raw materials and their modifications by mechanical processes. Methods and devices of mechanical activation with special regards to high energy density mills (vibrating mill, planetary ball mill, stirred media mill). Methods and devices of manufacture of particulate composites. Conscious control of the product properties by means of the optimization of process variables. Mechanical and thermal processes. Granulation methods and monitoring of the process and the resulted products. Quality control methods. Process engineering technologies. Application of advanced technologies in the industrial production. Case studies.

References:

  1. Juhász, A. Z. – Opoczky, L. Mechanical Activation of Minerals by Grinding. Akadémiai Kiadó – Ellis. Horwood Ltd Publishers.Budapest – Chichester, 1990
  2. Balá ž, P., 2008. Mechanochemistry in Nanoscience and Minerals Engineering. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (413 pp.).
  3. A.D. Salman and M.J. Hounslow, J.PK Seville: Granulation. Handbook of Powder Technology. Elsevier 2010.
  4. Current journal papers (Powder Technolgy, Advanced Powder Technology, Material Processing Technologies)
Production and innovation management (5 ECTS)

Having finished the course students will be able to recognize the new ideas in connection with their work and their daily lives. They will be able to manage the realization process and evaluate the results. Case studies and other practices examine successful and unsuccessful innovations from the past and the present.

Understanding and realizing the elements of innovation, distinction of micro- and macro aspects. Invention and innovation. R&D. Typology and business explanation: Models of Schumpeter, Valenta and Bucsy, accordance to the business strategy and basic marketing behavior. Diffusion: Recognizing and managing the popular products, services, and processes, handling typical success- and defect-factors. Thinking as an innovator: Practice for 1-3 lessons. Students must choose a branch and develop a product-idea for that, including the strategy of diffusion. Process of innovation: Various models and approaches of the realization process. Business solutions: network-building. Business possibilities among many partners. Knowledge and technology transfer: Information and knowledge management in the background of innovations. Models, processes, and local/international strategies. Low tech innovation: Strategic behavior of non-innovation-driven branches. Organizational innovation: (Re)building the organizational structure for aiding the action in connection with research and development. Measuring the innovation: Ways and methods for calculating the level of success. Evaluating methods for new ideas: Practice of managerial (light) tools for evaluating the non-calculable factors and effects of innovation. Financing the innovation: Financial possibilities and methods. Project-approach. Managing innovation in practice: Connection with CEO, project management, QA/QC. Strategic issues: International case studies to demonstrate the success factors and barriers.

References:

  1. Wild (1995): Production and Operations Management, Cassell
  2. Hill (1991): Production/Operations Management Text and Cases, Prentice Hall
  3. Halevi (2001): Handbook of Production Management Methods, Butterworth-Heinemann
  4. Fagerberg – Mowery – Nelson (2005): The Oxford Handbook of Innovation, Oxford University Press
  5. Terkel (1991): Integrative management, innovation and new venturing: A guide to sustained profitability, Elsevier
  6. Nelson (1993): National Innovation Systems. Oxford Press N.Y.
Materials equilibria (4 ECTS)

Aim of the course:

To demonstrate that in addition to classical temperature, pressure, and composition state determinants, phase size is determinative in the nanometer range, that is, it determines phase equilibria, not to mention chemical and electrochemical equilibria. Students will learn the expected phase balance, chemical balance in nano-sized materials and the basics of electrochemical equilibrium. To teach both theoretically and technically how to calculate phase equilibria in one- and two-component materials systems and how to read the characteristics of equilibrium from them.

Keywords:

System, phase, component, mole fraction, phase fraction, materials balance, characteristics of the equilibrium state, state parameters, Gibbs energy, laws of thermodynamics, condition of global and heterogeneous equilibria, phase rule, one-component phase diagrams (construction and interpretation), Gibbs energy of two-component mixtures and solutions, ideal solution and their phase diagrams (their derivation and interpretation), solutions models and the 4th law, compound phases, two-component phase diagrams (their derivation, interpretation and classification), phase diagrams + phase ratio diagrams + phase composition diagrams.

References:

  1. N. Saunders, AP Miodownik: CALPHAD, a Comprehensive Guide, Pergamon, 1998, 479 p
  2. Lukas HL, Fries SG, Sundman B: Computational Thermodynamics. The Calphad method. Cambridge University Press, 2007, Cambridge, UK, 313 pp.
  3. G.Kaptay: On the tendency of solutions to tend toward ideal solutions at high temperatures – Metall Mater Trans A, 2012, vol.43, pp. 531-543.
  4. G. Kaptay: Nano-Calphad: extension of the Calphad method to systems with nano-phases and complexions – J Mater Sci, 2012, vol.47, pp.8320-833
  5. G. Kaptay. The exponential excess Gibbs energy model revisited. Calphad, 2017, vol.56, pp.169-184. doi: 10.1016/j.calphad.2017.01.002.

+ course material (manuscript) written by G. Kaptay 2016 – 2018

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the theories and practical methods of natural and technical sciences

related to materials engineering.

– A fundamental knowledge of the information and communication technologies related to their profession.

  1. b) Skills

– Ability to define professional problems using mathematics and to answer them analytically and numerically using suitable equations (equation systems).

– Designing complex systems using a system approach and process-oriented way of thinking.

– Ability to determine the composition, structure, and properties of materials, as well as to select and operate the necessary instruments using relationships between different technical materials.

– Strive to enrich the knowledge base of the field with original ideas through self-education.

– Ability to establish and communicate a sound engineering position on materials engineering issues both in Hungarian in a foreign language.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to bring the latest achievements of the field to own development.

– Commitment to do high-level, high quality work, and striving to communicate this attitude to co-workers.

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems.

Project Management (6 ECTS)

The course aims at helping familarise students with project management concepts, terms, roles and processes. They will learn: how projects are defined; how the structure of an organization impacts project management; how project management roles and responsibilities are defined; how all projects can be mapped to the same basic life cycle structure; and how project management can be organized into functional areas.

Course content:

Project management has evolved to plan, coordinate and control the complex and diverse activities of modern industrial, commercial and management change and IT projects. The purpose of project management is to foresee or predict as many of the dangers and problems as possible and to plan, organize and control activities so that projects are completed successfully despite all the risks. The course involves the descriptions about perspectives, principles, stakeholders, sponsors, managers, and processes of a general project. Moreover, the course provides detailed information about managing the team, scope, schedule, budget, quality, and risks of the projects.

References:

  1. Dennis Lock: Project Management. Gower Publishing Limited (UK), 2013. ISBN-13: 978-0-566-08772-1
  2. Rodney Turner: Handbook of Project Management. Gower Publishing Limited (UK), 2012 3. Scott Berkun: Art of Project Management. Cambridge, MA: O’Reilly Media. ISBN 0-596-00786-8 (2005)
  3. A Guide To The Project Management Body Of Knowledge, 3rd ed., Project Management Institute. ISBN 1-930699-45-X (2003)
  4. James Lewis: Fundamentals of Project Management, 2nd ed., American Management Association. ISBN 0-8144-7132-3 (2002)

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the rules of preparing technical documentations.

– Comprehension of the organizational tools and methods of management

– Comprehension of the legislation related to their profession.

– Knowledge of measurement techniques and theories related to the field.

– A fundamental knowledge of the information and communication technologies related to their profession.

  1. b) Skills

– Strive to enrich the knowledge base of the field with original ideas through self-education.

– Designing and managing the use of necessary technical, economic, environmental and human resources.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to design and perform tasks individually or in a team at a professionally high level.

– Striving to perform work in a complex, system based and process-oriented way.

– Openness to professional training aimed at self-education and self-development.

– Commitment to do high-level, high quality work, and striving to communicate this attitude to co-workers.

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems.

– Making informed decisions individually after consultations with representatives from diverse fields (primarily that of law, economics, energy management, environmental protection), taking responsibility for decisions.

– Making decisions based on principles and applicability of environmental protection, quality assurance, consumer protection, product responsibility, equal rights to accessibility, as well as the basic principles of occupational health and safety, technological, economic and legal regulations, moreover basic requirements of engineering ethics.

Elective 1 : Polymer studies 2 (7 ECTS)

The aim of the course is to deepen students’ knowledge of polymeric materials, based on Polymer studies 1.

Course’ content:

Polymers and plastics definition. Preparation of polymer molecules. Description of polymers; average molecular weight, polydispersity. Stereo isomers, tacticity. Chain flexibility of polymers, related properties. Structure of polymeric bulks, behavior of polymeric chains and molecules, behavior of polymer segments in different force fields. Quantitative evaluation of physical behavior, using different methods. Determination of connections between the different behaviors (optical, electric, mechanical, thermal, etc.) Compatibility of polymers and additives, thermodynamics of mixing, preparation of blends and mixed systems. Structure-properties relations.

References:

  1. Painter, Paul C.; Coleman, Michael M. (1997). Fundamentals of polymer science: an introductory text. Lancaster, Pa.: Technomic Pub. Co. p. 1. ISBN 1-56676-559-5
  2. McCrum, N. G.; Buckley, C. P.; Bucknall, C. B. (1997). Principles of polymer engineering. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press. p. 1. ISBN 0-19-856526-7.
  3. Ashby, Michael; Jones, David (1996). Engineering Materials (2 ed.). Butterworth-Heinermann. pp. 191–195. ISBN 0-7506-2766-2.

Competences:

  1. a) Knowledge

– A detailed knowledge of the theories and practical methods of natural and technical sciences related to materials engineering.

– A comprehensive knowledge of modern materials structures and technologies.

  1. b) Skills

– Ability to determine the composition, structure, and properties of materials, as well as to select and operate the necessary instruments using relationships between different technical materials.

– Ability to perform laboratory investigations, to process, assess and document the measurement results.

  1. c) Attitude

– Striving to bring the latest achievements of the field to own development.

– Striving to enrich the knowledge base of their profession with original ideas through self-education.

– Striving to enforce the requirements of sustainability and energy efficiency.

  1. d) Autonomy and responsibility

– Acting independently and taking initiative in solving professional problems

– Taking responsibility for sustainability and environmental consciousness.

Elective 2: Waste preparation technologies and qualification of wastes (7 ECTS)

This class gives the knowledge of theoretical and practical fundaments for the operation of waste preparation units and deepens the knowledge of waste management with introducing technological processes.

Fundamental terms and application fields of unit operations and process engineering. Production and consumption wastes. Characterization of coarse disperse systems. Characterization of waste materials in unit operations point of view. The unit operations and processes of changing of the disperse- and mixed state of multi-phase dispersed materials. The acting forces during the change of the state of the processed dispersed materials. The characterization and evaluation of comminution and agglomeration technological processes. Features of the change of the particle size and volume, rate of comminution and the breakage work. The material and energy transfer balances of material component separation technological processes. The unit operation features of the separation processes, evaluation of productivity (component content, yield and recovery, efficiency). Production of secondary raw materials and secondary fuels from municipal solid wastes (MSW). The comparison of different MSW processing technologies in respect of the material and energy balances.

Let the students know the engineering, mathematical statistics, physical – chemical – biological analytical and legal authorization knowledge by with they will be able to sample and qualify of wastes in waste management.

Summary of applied engineering knowledge of mathematical statistics and its theoretical and practical application for wastes. The identification, classification and notation systems of wastes according to their origin and tax and customs clearance system. Types of waste landfills and limit values for the acceptable wastes. Waste characterization: basic characterization – examination of identity – examination of conformity – on-site inspection. Physical, chemical and biological analytical methods of waste characterization.

References:

  1. Drzymala J.: Mineral processing, foundations of theory and practice of metallurgy. Wroclaw University of Technology Publisher, 2007.
  2. Finch, James A.; Wills, Barry Alan: Wills’ Mineral Processing Technology, Eighth Edition: An Introduction to the Practical Aspects of Ore Treatment and Mineral Recovery. 2015
  3. Standards
  4. Lecture notes

Second year

In year 2 students will specialise in a study field of choice with one of AMIR’s three Year 2 partner universities, followed by an internship with a research organisation, industrial partner or academic partner.

Students will have the choice to specialise at either: Technical University of Darmstadt, University of Liège, or Technical University of Madrid. This part of the programme offers students the opportunity to follow select advanced materials classes for various applications, including energy, e-mobility, magnets, transport and environments – catalysis.

The academic specialisations are:

  • Material design for recycling in Darmstadt
  • Metallurgy and metals recycling in Liège
  • Mineral recycling for construction and other sectors in Madrid. Particular focus on Circular Economy.

Graduates of the AMIR programme will be awarded a double Master of Science degree (double diploma) for all tracks, except for Bordeaux – Liège, where students are only awarded the Bordeaux degree. Note that the Lisbon – Liège and Miskolc – Liège tracks will only result in double diplomas if certain modules are completed in Lisbon or Miskolc beforehand. Graduates will also be awarded the EIT Label Certificate.

3rd semester – Autumn Semester

In the second year of the AMIR Programme, study at Technische Universität Darmstadt (TUD) provides deep insights into selected advanced materials classes for energy applications as well as e-mobility (magnets), accompanied by insights into how to design such materials in consideration to their optimised recyclability. This is achieved by teaching basic knowledge on functional materials and on surfaces and interfaces. Additionally, students will get the chance to choose between three different subjects:

  • Material Science for Renewable Energy Systems
  • Electrochemistry in Energy Applications I: Converter Devices 
  • Magnetism and Magnetic Materials

Students will also develop practical insights within an advanced research lab, giving them the chance to participate in ‘real science’ at a research group of their choice at TUD. The second year at TUD is rounded off by a 6-month master’s thesis, which should be conducted at a research and technology organisation (RTO) or (preferably) at an industrial company (not necessarily a partner of AMIR), which is considered as the ‘training period’ within the AMIR programme. Ultimately, students who have chosen to further their AMIR Master at TUD will graduate with the Master of Science in Materials Science from TUD in addition to their degree received from the University of Bordeaux.

3rd semester – Autumn Semester
Advanced Research Lab with Seminar

Each of the working groups offers scientific tasks which are part of the students research programme. These tasks have no fixed solution, the solution has to be developed in an interplay between the students and those involved in the research group. The students have to hand out a written report of their lab work and present a talk summarising their findings. Each student is exposed to a controlled research activity within a real scientific working group. He/she will gain the ability to understand a scientific problem from its different aspects and how a limited research task is connected to a more general and broader research objective. The student will gain experience in judging which type of research matches his/her individual interests and capabilities. As a result, the student will gain the competence to choose a suitable topic for their master thesis.

Expected Learning: The students will become acquainted with the practice of presenting their results in front of scientists who are working within that field of research. Students will learn to present in a clear and ordered way and understand how to use modern means of presentations such as animated images etc. Student will also gain experience in defending his/her work against critical questions.

Surfaces and Interfaces

This part of the course will see students undertaking the following topics:

  • Surfaces of solids: thermodynamics of surface formation, structure of surfaces, electronic structure of surface and surface potentials.
  • Kinetics of surface reactions: physisorption and chemisorption, surface diffusion, surface reactions and catalysis.
  • Internal surfaces: structural models, thermodynamics of internal surfaces, epitaxy and growth modes.
  • Solid/electrolyte interfaces: thermodynamics and electrochemical double layers, thermodynamics of electrochemical reactions, kinetics of electrochemical reactions, corrosion and corrosion modes.

Expected Learning: The student will be able to understand and treat the specific effects of surfaces and interfaces in materials science, differentiate between thermodynamically and kinetically determined properties and know the important terms and definitions and related theoretical concepts used in surface/interface science and electrochemistry. They will also have achieved a conceptual understanding of how surfaces/interfaces affect the properties of presented devices and achieve a materials science related understanding of electrochemical processes, with the ability to transfer this knowledge to any future envisaged problems and materials. The student will have reached a level of competence to differentiate between bulk and surface effects in devices and correlate them with a materials properties to become qualified to evaluate experimental and theoretical methods in their potential future research involving surface/interface effects and electrolyte interfaces. They will also have the competence to follow advanced textbooks and scientific literature.

Functional Materials

This part of the course will see a study into conductivity in metals, semiconductors, thermoelectricity, organic semiconductors, ionic conductors, dielectric and ferroelectric materials, introduction to magnetism and magnetic materials, magnetic materials and their applications (permanent and soft magnets), magnetocaloric materials, metal hydrides, superconductors.
Expected Learning: Students will gain knowledge of the most important principles within the material classes mentioned above, focusing not only on the physical principles, but also the materials synthesis and application of the most important functional materials. Furthermore, applications of these material classes will be discussed. Students will also be able to develop and characterise simple devices constructed from the above mentioned materials.

Option I - Materials Science for Renewable Energy Systems (Energy Materials)

This part of the course will see students undertaking a study of bonding interactions, bonding properties in solids, electronic properties of solids, thermal properties of solids, thermodynamics and kinetics of defects, ion conduction materials, mechanical properties of solids, high temperature materials, surface and interfaces of solids, typical energy materials used in specific energy devices (solar cell, battery, fuel cell, turbine, blades, etc.).

Expected Learning: Students will learn the basic concepts of materials science and will be introduced to the main focus of physical properties as a dependent on material composition and microstructure on the influence of non-idealities and on the combinations of materials. Selection criteria for the application of materials will be introduced as used for typical energy applications. Students will develop the competence to correlate basic materials properties and engineering strategies with the needed applicability for devices. They should also be able to judge results from the literature and understand the limitations and perspectives of given research approaches.

Option II - Choice of any course offered by the Materials Science Department (minimum of 4 ECTS)
Option III - Magnetic Materials

This part of the course will study basic notions of magnetism, magnetism in atoms and ions, magnetism in metallic materials, crystal field symmetry and exchange interaction, magnetically ordered structures, magnetic order, symmetry and phase transitions, micromagnetism and domain behaviour, experimental methods in magnetism, selected (hot) topics from current research.

Expected Learning: Students will be able to remember the basic notions of magnetism for a broad range of situations and materials. Students will develop the competence to differentiate between different types of magnetism and their origin and to correlate them with materials properties. They will also become qualified to evaluate experimental and theoretical methods for goal-oriented research in the area of magnetism and magnetic materials and will develop knowledge of modern magnetic materials and their use in current applications. Finally, students will gain insight into modern research in magnetism and magnetic materials and a beginner’s level competence to follow advanced textbooks and scientific literature.

4th semester – Spring Semester
Internship in industry or RTO (Research and Technology Organisation)

Students will undertake a 6-month internship, typically in one of the Research and Technology Organisations laboratories or industries, as well as any industrial partner or start-up with the desire to join the consortium that are able to bring added-value to the programme. Students will be able to choose the best internship for their future career or even create their own start up during this period!

Masters Thesis

During their thesis period students will first become familiarised with their subject of choice and set-up a work schedule. Students will also undertake experimental and/or theoretical work on a scientific subject, documentation of the results by authoring the Master Thesis, presentation of the results in a talk with subsequent scientific discussion, public presentation of the results of the Master Thesis with subsequent scientific discussion.

Expected Learning: Students will know the foundational discussions around a current topic, usually a research related question in materials science. They will know the structure and composition of scientific publications and will be able to apply acquired knowledge and qualifications to specific scientific topics with newly acquired methods and means, in order to independently work on scientific problems in sufficient depth and breadth. They will also be able to autonomously create documentation and presentations about their research work and results. Finally, students will be able to adequately present their results and discuss and defend them in a public scientific environment.

3rd semester – Autumn Semester
Raw Materials in the Circular Economy

This part of the course introduces students to the geopolitical, geological and technological issues in raw materials. Critical raw materials – challenges and trends; Resource efficiency. From studying the course students will be able to:

  • Understand the complexity in the supply/demand chain of raw materials in the context of a globalised and connected world.
  • Understand the dynamics of resources and reserves as well as the economics of primary and secondary raw materials.
  • Be aware of economic influencing factors and the importance of securing the supply chain for metals (base, precious, critical) and major mineral ores.
  • Identify the right sources for a given need or to find alternative resources that meet the sustainable development criteria.
  • Implement lifecycle analysis studies and understand their opportunities and limits.
Extractive Metallurgy

This area of the course deepens the student’s knowledge of metallurgical processes used for production of the main non-ferrous, precious and platinum metals. Theoretical and practical aspects of extractive metallurgical industries are discussed together with the basics of modern hydrometallurgy. The latter is supported by case studies exemplifying operational flowsheets for leaching mineral ores and concentrates. From studying the course students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic notions in mineral thermodynamics and solid-liquid phase stabilities.
  • Implement operations aimed at selective dissolving, separating and concentrating metals (hydrometallurgy, hydrolysis, electrorefining, reactive extraction).
  • Understand the origin of metal value and design an optimal processing route in terms of economics and environmental impact.
  • Be well aware of major industrial operations and capable of identifying new advanced routes for materials recovery from end of-life products by extractive metallurgy.
Solid Waste and by-product Processing

This area of the course is centred around the questions of how recycling could contribute to overcoming the materials shortage and what the economic importance of technological challenges are within the reuse and recycling of “secondary” resources. From studying the course students will be able to:

  • Properly implement the different unit operations for processing waste materials (shredders, sorters, eddy-current and ballistic separators).
  • Select the best available technologies and develop an optimised flow sheet for processing a given waste stream.
  • Become aware of valuable by-products and opportunities for residual wastes (industrial ecology).
  • Become familiarised with existing industrial activities in waste processing and capable of identifying new opportunities in this field of activity.
Economic and Societal Issues in Mining and Recycling

This part of the course focuses on the economic issues in mining and recycling industries. Legislation. Environmental aspects. Social Corporate responsibility. From studying the course students will be able to:

  • Become familiar with industrial players and other stakeholders in the EU mining and recycling sector.
  • Get to know how innovative SMEs in the recycling sector are created and operate.
  • Understand their business models, opportunities and threats for their activities.
  • Be aware of the importance of non-technical factors on the recycling of metals (taw regimes, waste disposal fees, collection of end-of-life products, health and safety, logistics).
  • Become creative and open-minded with respect to business opportunities, including in the social economy.
Introduction to the Modelling of Chemical Processes

This part of the course will provide an introduction to the general principles of modelling. Application of these principles in the field of process engineering. Objectives, needs and limitations of modelling and simulation. General modelling procedure applied to solving process flowsheets. Process tearing to iterative flowsheet solving. Energy supply-demand analysis in chemical industries. From studying the course students will be able to:

  • Learn how to build a conceptual model for a single unit operation.
  • Identify specifications, characteristic variables and resulting degrees of freedom for a model.
  • Integrate bloc models inside a flow-sheet model and choose numerical methods to solve industrial process models.
  • Represent thermal energy requirements and identify potential of energy-saving technologies.
  • Learn how to use purposely built simulation tools.
High Temperature Processes in Recycling and Remanufacturing

This part of the course will introduce the topics of pyrometallurgy and thermodynamics. Iron and steel production and recycling. Production and recycling of Cu, Al, Pb, Zn, precious metals and REE and provide a holistic view on high temperature processes – resource & energy efficiency. Base metals pyrometallurgy in practice; Re-manufacturing; Technological challenges. From studying the course students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic notions in pyrometallurgy of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
  • Identify secondary resources that can/have to be processed via pyro- instead of hydro- metallurgy.
  • Be aware about the BAT opportunities and reasons for recovery/loss of metals in pyrometallurgical processes.
  • Design an optimal pyrometallurgical processing route for selected metals and waste streams and assess energy requirements.
  • Become aware of existing major industrial operations and identify new viable routes in high temperature processing of complex wastes and end-of-life products.
  • Modify material selection and product design to positively impact on the viability of pyrometallurgical operations.
  • Analyse wear and/or corrosion mechanisms in extreme environments under various situations encountered in pyrometallurgical processing. Select an appropriate method(s) to improve/repair and test materials durability.
4th semester – Spring Semester
Internship in industry or RTO (Research and Technology Organisation)

Students will undertake a 6-month internship, typically in one of the Research and Technology Organisations laboratories or industries, as well as any industrial partner or start-up with the desire to join the consortium that are able to bring added-value to the programme. Students will be able to choose the best internship for their future career or even create their own start up during this period!

Master Thesis

During their thesis period students will first become familiarised with their subject of choice and set-up a work schedule. Students will also undertake experimental and/or theoretical work on a scientific subject, documentation of the results by authoring the Master Thesis, presentation of the results in a talk with subsequent scientific discussion, public presentation of the results of the Master Thesis with subsequent scientific discussion.

Expected Learning: Students will know the foundational discussions around a current topic, usually a research related question in materials science. They will know the structure and composition of scientific publications and will be able to apply acquired knowledge and qualifications to specific scientific topics with newly acquired methods and means, in order to independently work on scientific problems in sufficient depth and breadth. They will also be able to autonomously create documentation and presentations about their research work and results. Finally, students will be able to adequately present their results and discuss and defend them in a public scientific environment.

3rd semester – Autumn Semester
Fundamentals of Urban Mining

On this part of the course students will gain the following learning outcomes: 

  • A knowledge of the safeguarding of the environment and the promotion of resource conservation through reuse, recycling and recovery of secondary resources from waste.
  • An understanding of the different secondary resources and economic value of waste streams generated in urban spaces.
  • A basic understanding of the planning and designing of sustainable urban spaces, making the process consistent with the sustainable development goals.
  • A basic understanding of the concept of extracting valuable materials from existing infrastructure, landfills and the dissipation of them into the environment.

Syllabus:

  • Introduction to Urban Mining
  • E-Waste
  • Development of Urban Mining
  • Urban Mining and energy
  • Spatial data analysis 
  • Introduction to Life Cycle Assessment and Case studies
Construction & Demolition Waste Quantification, Minimisation and Recycling. Building with Recycled Materials

On this part of the course students will gain the following learning outcomes: 

  • Knowledge on current EU legal measures for construction and demolition waste.
  • An understanding of the different waste quantification tools, software and databases used for construction and demolition waste.
  • An understanding of the current best practices on waste minimisation and the correct management of whole construction projects, from design to execution phase.
  • Sufficient knowledge for drafting Waste Management Plans.
  • An opportunity to design sustainable materials and products manufactured with construction and demolition waste.

Syllabus:

  • Legal framework for the construction and demolition of waste in the EU – focused on Spain
  • Construction and demolition waste quantification tools
  • Best practices for waste minimisation and management
  • Construction and demolition waste management (with case study)
  • Recycled materials for building construction
  • Characterisation of new building materials with construction and demolition waste​
  • Design of new construction products manufactured with recycled materials​
Characterisation and Management of Construction Products

On this part of the course students will gain the following learning outcomes:

  • Knowledge of the current picture of construction and demolition waste (CDW) in the EU: end-of-life products generated, different sources, type of fractions, etc.
  • How to plan a design for deconstruction measures (design stage); hazardous waste decontamination, concrete sawing and drilling, dismantling, decommissioning, demolition, preparation for recycling and recycling (end-of-life stage).
  • Identify relevant scientific sources as the basis for deepening an understanding of particularities of waste fractions.
  • Analyse patented technology: use, potential, etc.
  • Analyse the existing business models for the end-of-life of construction products.
  • Contribute to the design and analysis of innovative pilot value chains for a circular economy.
  • Analyse chemical and physical properties of CDW and secondary raw materials.
Resource Efficiency in Mineral Processes

On this part of the course students will gain the following learning outcomes:

  • Knowledge on current efficient and sustainable mineral (raw or wastes) forming processes and the relationship with previous material processing.
  • How to use software and databases on processing selection.
  • An understanding of how to analyse the results of forming processes, in addition to a cost analysis and end user requirement analysis of final products.
  • An understanding of the standardisation of the materials field to fulfill product specification.
  • A basic understanding of the value chain of efficient forming of raw or waste minerals.
  • How to discuss case studies and laboratory results on sustainable mineral forming process.

Syllabus:

  • Introduction to efficient forming processes. Standardisation 
  • Processing techniques. Raw mineral and wastes conditioning
  • Processing selection. Quality and product’s final characteristics
Technological Innovation and Entrepreneurship

On this part of the course students will gain the following learning outcomes:

  • An awareness in how to develop an entrepreneurial attitude
  • The ability to generate and develop business ideas within a given entity (intrapreneurship).
  • How to develop a (successful) business model.
  • An understanding of the financial needs for creation and growth of a business.
  • Knowledge on the steps to create a sustainable technology-based company.

Syllabus:

  • Introduction to entrepreneurship fundamentals 
  • Eleven steps to analyse a business model proposal
  • Fast analysis methodology
  • Marketing and operations
  • Financial fundamentals
  • Writing a business plan
  • Demo Day
Training for Professional Digital Competence

On this part of the course students will gain the following learning outcomes:

  • How to analyse existing massive open online courses (MOOCs) worldwide and be able to assess their progress.
  • Improvement of their personal learning environment (PLE).
  • Assess new ICTs and sources to incorporate to their PLE.
  • Use MOOCs as a way to enhance formal and informal learning outcomes.
  • Improvement of their online digital presence.
  • Improvement of presentation skills under real conditions.

Syllabus:

  • MOOCs in the field of transversal competencies. Training and assessment through MOOCs
  • Introduction to PLE
  • Guidelines to create a PLE
  • MOOCs and PLE
  • Management of the digital identity. Self-assessment and peer review
  • Presentation skills
4th semester – Spring Semester
Internship in industry or RTO (Research and Technology Organisation)

Students will undertake a 6-month internship, typically in one of the Research and Technology Organisations laboratories or industries, as well as any industrial partner or start-up with the desire to join the consortium that are able to bring added-value to the programme. Students will be able to choose the best internship for their future career or even create their own start up during this period!

Masters Thesis

During their thesis period students will first become familiarised with their subject of choice and set-up a work schedule. Students will also undertake experimental and/or theoretical work on a scientific subject, documentation of the results by authoring the Master Thesis, presentation of the results in a talk with subsequent scientific discussion, public presentation of the results of the Master Thesis with subsequent scientific discussion.

Expected Learning: Students will know the foundational discussions around a current topic, usually a research related question in materials science. They will know the structure and composition of scientific publications and will be able to apply acquired knowledge and qualifications to specific scientific topics with newly acquired methods and means, in order to independently work on scientific problems in sufficient depth and breadth. They will also be able to autonomously create documentation and presentations about their research work and results. Finally, students will be able to adequately present their results and discuss and defend them in a public scientific environment.